Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Latin LOLCat: More Boldly

Here is today's Latin LOLCat: The Latin words are from Vergil's Aeneid. Captain James Kirk may have gone forth boldly, but this kitteh is going for more boldly! The Latin comparative forms are often used like this to express intensity, i.e. "I will go forth very boldly indeed." If you are interested in Latin proverbs and fables, check out the Bestiaria Latina blog.

Audentior ibo.

I will go forth more boldly.


Poster: Flowers



April showers bring summer flowers.
(English proverb)


The source for this rhyming proverb is English Proverbs and Proverbial Phrases by William Carew Hazlitt (Google Books). The poster is made with AutoMotivator. The image is by Derek K. Miller at Flickr.

Monday, April 14, 2014

Poster: Untouched Drum


An untouched drum does not speak.
(Liberian proverb)

The source for the proverb is David Crystal's book, As They Say in Zanzibar: Proverbial Wisdom from Around the World (Oxford University Press: 2006). The poster is made with AutoMotivator.

The image is by Ben Tubby at Flickr.

Latin LOLCat: Shadow of God

Here is today's Latin LOLCat: You can see this used as the motto on a sundial; see below. If you are interested in Latin proverbs and fables, check out the Bestiaria Latina blog. I've got a series of posts there on Latin sundials, in fact!

Lux umbra dei est.

Light is God's shadow.




Sunday, April 13, 2014

Poster: Day and Evening

This proverb - No day so long but has its evening - holds true for literal days (especially the long ones), but of course it also applies to anything that unfolds in time, anything that starts and finally comes to an end... and everything, no matter how long, does come to its end in time.


No day so long but has its evening.
(French proverb)

The source for the proverb is David Crystal's book, As They Say in Zanzibar: Proverbial Wisdom from Around the World (Oxford University Press: 2006).
The image is by Astacus at Flickr.
The poster is made with AutoMotivator.

Latin LOLCat: Blessed

Here is today's Latin LOLCat. Note that the Latin rhymes: homo - domo. The Latin word beatus which you see here gives us the English word "beatitudes," a term used to refer to the famous sermon with the refrain "blessed are you" from the Gospels of Matthew and Luke; you can read more about that at Wikipedia. If you are interested in Latin proverbs and fables, check out the Bestiaria Latina blog.

Beatus ille homo qui vivit sua domo.

Blessed is he who lives in his own home.

Saturday, April 12, 2014

Latin LOLCat: Wisdom

Here is today's Latin LOLCat; you can see a very similar rhyme in this poster (it's common for there to be little variations like this from one version of a proverb to another). If you are interested in Latin proverbs and fables, check out the Bestiaria Latina blog.

Discat, qui nescit, nam sic sapientia crescit.

Let him learn who does not know, for thus does knowledge grow.


Poster: A Bird's Note

This proverb makes a nice comparison between the characteristic songs of birds and the way that people's words likewise reveal their identity or character. In the digital world, of course, a man is known by both spoken and written words — not just by his talk, but by his tweets too, and so we can extend the bird metaphor into the modern age! :-)



A bird is known by its note, and a man by his talk.
(English proverb)


The source for the proverb is English Proverbs and Proverbial Phrases by William Carew Hazlitt (Google Books). The poster is made with AutoMotivator. The image shows a nightingale at Wikipedia.

Friday, April 11, 2014

Poster: The Kitchen

This is one of those English sayings that has stood the test of time and is still widely recognized, even though our kitchens are not hot like they used to be back in the days of wood-fired stoves and ovens! The sayings is most famously associated with U.S. President Harry Truman, who is also known for another saying that is still widely used: "The buck stops here."



If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen.
(English proverb)


You can read about this English proverb online at The Phrase Finder. The poster is made with AutoMotivator. The image is by SMcGarnigle at Flickr.

Latin LOLCat: Imperator

Here is today's Latin LOLCat: The Latin word imperator which you see here gives us the English word "emperor" - but the root meaning is "commander, someone who gives orders" (imperatives), so I chose "boss" for the English version. If you are interested in Latin proverbs and fables, check out the Bestiaria Latina blog.

Egomet sum mihi imperator.

I am my own boss.


Thursday, April 10, 2014

Poster: Angry Dove

The dove is a symbol of peace, of course, but even a dove can get angry! This proverb warns you to beware: if something has made even the dove angry, then something has gone very wrong indeed. The anger of a creature who is normally peaceful can be the most dangerous anger exactly because it is so rare.



Dread the anger of the dove.
(French: Craignez la colère de la colombe.)


The source for the proverb is A Polyglot of Foreign Proverbs by Henry G. Bohn (GoogleBooks). The poster is made with AutoMotivator. The image is Some rights reserved by jaclu at Flickr.

Latin LOLCat: Beware!

Here is today's Latin LOLCat: The Latin word cave which you see here is the same verb as in the famous phrase Caveat emptor, "Let the buyer beware." If you are interested in Latin proverbs and fables, check out the Bestiaria Latina blog.

Cave ab eo quem non nosti.

Beware of someone you don't know.


Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Latin LOLCat: Hard work

Here is today's Latin LOLCat: This is the motto of some branches of the Campbell family. If you are interested in Latin proverbs, mottoes, and fables, check out the Bestiaria Latina blog. I'm not really sure what's going on with this picture, but if this cat is rolling a watermelon out of a lake, hey, that counts as labor for sure! :-)

Labor omnia superat.

Hard work overcomes all things.


Proverb: Meat and Bones

I think this is a marvelous proverb, both because it has the charm of rhyme (rhyming proverbs are my favorite!) and also the power of truth, too. The idea is that you take the bad with the good - the stones with the land you would plow, and the bones with the meat you would eat, along with all the metaphorical variants thereof.



You buy land, you buy stones; you buy meat, you buy bones.
(English proverb)

The source for the proverb is Concise Oxford Dictionary of Proverbs by Jennifer Speake (Amazon). The poster is made with AutoMotivator. The image is by Beau Lebens at Flickr.